UCONN Emergency Medicine Interest Group

Posts Tagged ‘wilderness medicine’

Connecticut Toxicology – last call

In ANNOUNCEMENTS, CONNECTICUT TOXICOLOGY on March 25, 2012 at 3:13 PM

The Connecticut Toxicology project will be concluding data collection by April 1st, 2012. If you have not already, please feel free to take a look at one or more of the modules, accessible by going to the “Connecticut Toxicology” tab above and scrolling down through the choices. Please make sure to complete both the pre and post-module surveys.

Thank you,
Max Falkoff, MS4

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Connecticut Toxicology: Plant Edition

In CONNECTICUT TOXICOLOGY on February 8, 2012 at 3:34 PM

Feed me Seymour, feed me!

The latest modules of Connecticut Toxicology have been released! Access them by clicking on the “Connecticut Toxicology” section header above, then scrolling down past the introduction/cover letter to the module that you want to take. These modules are all about plant life– from a general approach to their identification, to several individual poisonous or otherwise unpleasant plants. Did you ever wonder what would happen if you ate those berries that mom always told you to stay away from? Learn all about it by taking the modules! This is part of my selective project, and your help, by means of taking the surveys and reading through (or listening to) the modules would be much appreciated.

This is also the last group of modules to be released, meaning that the Connecticut Toxicology project is now completely published and available. Please feel free to explore!

Connecticut Toxicology: Mushroom, Mushroom!

In CONNECTICUT TOXICOLOGY on January 10, 2012 at 2:40 PM

The last modules of Connecticut Toxicology have been released! Access them by clicking on the “Connecticut Toxicology” section header above, then scrolling down past the introduction/cover letter to the module that you want to take. These modules are all about mushrooms- the basic process that a mycologist uses to identify them, and several species of poisonous¬† mushrooms that you really want to know. This is part of my selective project, and your help, by means of taking the surveys and reading through (or listening to) the modules would be much appreciated. The modules will eventually also be released in podcast form; however, due to computer issues, this will be somewhat delayed. Check them out!

Connecticut Toxicology: Marine Edition

In CONNECTICUT TOXICOLOGY on December 30, 2011 at 9:05 PM

The newest 2 modules of Connecticut Toxicology have been released! Access them by clicking on the “Connecticut Toxicology” section header above, then scrolling down past the introduction/cover letter to the module that you want to take. These 2 modules are marine in theme, with one module on jellyfish, and the other on stingrays. This is part of my selective project, and your help, by means of taking the surveys and reading through (or listening to) the modules would be much appreciated. The modules also come in podcast form, meaning that you can download them as MP3 files and listen to them on your iPod, or whatever other MP3 player or smartphone you might own on the go. Check it out!

Connecticut Toxicology: Snake, Snake, it’s a Snaaaaake!

In CONNECTICUT TOXICOLOGY on December 23, 2011 at 5:51 PM

HISSSSSSSSSSSS….. The next module of Connecticut Toxicology has been released! Access it by clicking on the “Connecticut Toxicology” section header above, then scrolling down past the introduction/cover letter to the module that you want to take. This latest module is about the two venomous snake species that live in Connecticut- do you know what they are? This is part of my selective project, and your help, by means of taking the surveys and reading through (or listening to) the modules would be much appreciated.

Connecticut Toxicology: Creepy-Crawly Edition!

In CONNECTICUT TOXICOLOGY on December 9, 2011 at 9:12 AM

The first 2 modules of Connecticut Toxicology have been released! Access them by clicking on the “Connecticut Toxicology” section header above, then scrolling down past the introduction/cover letter to the module that you want to take. These 2 modules are creepy-crawly-themed, with one module on the poisonous spider that lives in Connecticut, and the other on those pesky stinging bees, wasps, and hornets (AKA Hymenoptera, for those who are more Latinate-inclined). This is part of my selective project, and your help, by means of taking the surveys and reading through (or listening to) the modules would be much appreciated. The modules also come in podcast form, meaning that you can download them as MP3 files and listen to them on your iPod, or whatever other MP3 player or smartphone you might own on the go. Check it out!

Wilderness Medicine Symposium!

In ANNOUNCEMENTS on October 1, 2011 at 5:29 PM

Today the 11th annual UCONN Wilderness Medicine Symposium was held at Winding Trails and was a great success! Led by Katherine Farmer and Colin Huguenel (both MS4) with support from Dr. Regan, Dr. Gottschalk, and Jeff Hogan. Thanks to them and to all who showed up, as well as Winding Trails for letting us use their facilities.

Journal Article Synopsis: Ibuprofen and Acetazolamide as Prophylaxis for High Altitude Headache

In JOURNAL CLUB on May 18, 2011 at 5:50 PM

Summary for “Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Comparison of Acetazolamide Versus Ibuprofen for Prophylaxis Against High Altitude Headache: The Headache Evaluation at Altitude Trial (HEAT) by Jeffery Gertsch, MD, et al. in Wilderness and Environmental Medicine vol 21 pp: 236-243.

What is already known on this topic:
Headaches are one of the most common complaints from those who venture into high altitudes. Termed High Altitude Headaches (HAH), these can occur as benign incidents but are also considered a sentinel symptom of the development of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). AMS is defined at altitudes above 2500m with the presence of headache and one other symptom (anorexia, fatigue, insomnia, or dizziness).  Left untreated, AMS can lead to High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) which is associated with a significant mortality rate. Ibuprofen was widely been used in the treatment of HAH through its inhibition of the inflammatory pathway. Acetazolamide, a diuretic and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has also been documented in the prevention of altitude headaches. The mechanisms of AMS prevention include renally induced metabolic acidosis resulting in diuresis and increased ventilation and inhibition of CSF production.

What questions this study addressed:
Despite the frequency with which HAH occur, there is a relative lack of literature pertaining to its prevention. This study was designed to compare the effects of treatment with ibuprofen with acetazolamide while also better establishing clinical standards for HAH prevention.

What was the study design:
This study was a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

What this study adds to our knowledge:
Both ibuprofen and acetazolamide proved effective in the prevention of HAH and can be recommended for prophylaxis at altitude with the inference that acetazolamide may prevent more severe headaches. The clinical efficacy of low-dose acetazolamide in the prevention of AMS has been reconfirmed and ibuprofen was also found to be effective against symptoms of AMS.

How this is relevant to clinical practice:
The use of these drugs in high altitude situations may help lower the incidence of AMS and thus prevent the onset of HACE and decrease the incidence of HACE-related mortality.

Other considerations:
Would other NSAIDs provide the same or similar protection? Is the action of ibuprofen simply masking the pain of a true underlying HAH? The participants were already at a high altitude before they began the study. What then, would be the effect of ibuprofen and acetazolamide on people going from low altitude to high. Are these drugs really preventing HAPE/HACE or are they simply preventing one of the symptoms?

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